Posts tagged ‘bone’

September 17, 2014

There’s a Better Way To Calculate Body Fat (and We’ve Got It!)

3D-printed Laughing Buddha (right) by Digital Nuisance via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)Obesity and its negative effects on our collective health has been covered repeatedly in the news. There are ways of defining being overweight or obese, most based on height, weight and body mass index (BMI). Body composition is another means of analyzing percentage of body fat, and another tool to help guide and follow treatment.

 

Let’s start with the numbers: accurate weight and height are a starting point. Getting your body mass index (which you can do here once you have your height and weight) is helpful in determining whether your weight is appropriate for your height. But to be truly accurate about weight, body fat and its affect on health, knowing what percentage of your body tissue is fat specifically can be helpful. Here is where radiology can help: DEXA is the most accurate means of assessing body composition.

 

DEXA is known most commonly for measuring bone mineral density. This can identify those with osteoporosis or those beginning to show signs of bone loss. Knowing your bone mineral density is increasingly important with age, and preventing fractures is a goal.

 

DEXA (or Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry if you want to know the words behind the acronym) is the most accurate method of assessing body composition. A DEXA scan is a medical test and is considered the Gold Standard in body composition testing with over 99% accuracy. This imaging technique using low dose x-rays can evaluate bone density, fat density and lean body mass. DEXA gives a total picture of body composition, useful for planning a course of action and then seeing the success (we’ll think positive!) of those actions.

 

Eating well, exercising regularly, talking to your doctor or consulting with a dietician are all actions that can help you on the way to better numbers. Decreasing body fat percentage while maintaining healthy lean body mass is the goal. Decreasing body fat percentage is as significant as overall weight loss to your health.

 

So start with your numbers and move from there. You have the power to get yourself on the road to your best possible health! And we’re happy to help in any way we can, from sharing healthy recipes to exercise tips and tricks to advising you on your DEXA scores to cheering you on and educating you along the way! If you follow us on Pinterest you’ll see more ideas everyday!

(Image attribution: 3D-printed Laughing Buddha (right) by Digital Nuisance via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0))

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

June 30, 2014

Introducing… Indy!

independence-officeIn our final installment of the “Introducing Diagnostic Imaging Centers” series, we’d like to introduce our Independence, Missouri location.

 

Indy, as it is affectionately known, is a wonderful clinic full of compassionate staff and expert radiologists. Found at 4911 Arrowhead Drive, it is conveniently located near the intersection of highways 70 and 470/291.

 

As at most of our offices, we offer a full range of modalities: breast imaging, CT, DEXA (bone density), MRI (both traditional and “open”), nuclear medicine, ultrasound, fluoroscopy and x-ray. Walk-in appointments are available for many modalities, including CT and mammography – have some time? Come on by and our dedicated staff will take care of you!

 

Our patients love the care they receive at this office – from the smiles at the front desk to the above and beyond care they get from technologists to doctors. With good-humored colleagues, the Indy team is serious about their work and lighthearted in their approach to life. From the front desk, to the technologists, they embrace their tasks with professionalism while putting patients at ease. If you require imaging procedures, you have a choice in where to go and the DIC staff at our Independence office and at all of our facilities appreciate you choosing to come to us.

 

Passionate about top quality imaging care, the team at Indy has passions beyond their work. From the Komen Foundation to Head for the Cure to gardening and grandkids, DIC-ers are a caring lot. For our staff, caring about people is more than a job.

 

But to quote LaVar Burton, you don’t have to take our word for it… here’s what our patients had to say about their experiences at our Independence office:

 

“Nikki (front desk) is awesome and smiles every time I am here!”

 

“Stephen went above and beyond for services. Dr. Koury went even farther, if that is possible. Many thanks to both of them!”

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

June 4, 2014

We Love… Best Bones Forever!

Best Bones Forever by Office of Women's Health via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public DomainAs doctors, we find many people and organizations we love – from patients who we care about deeply to nonprofits that are assisting others on the road to their best possible health. Today we’d like to highlight a really great initiative: Best Bones Forever!

 

Best Bones Forever focuses on the bone health of young girls with the hope of avoiding bone health issues later in life. You know the old saying about an ounce of prevention being worth a pound of cure – well, it’s true! Taking care of yourselves when you are young can help avoid a world of aches further down the line.

 

An initiative of the Office of Women’s Health, the hope is to help prevent conditions like osteoporosis, or loss of bone mass that affects many elderly women. Bone loss can lead to a higher risk of fractures which can be associated with life-threatening complications and side effects which have a profound impact on quality of life. As it turns out, keeping bones strong now means having stronger bones in the future. So whether it’s exercise or a diet with the proper nutrition, the aim is to help girls develop a lifestyle of healthiness that will last them a lifetime and result in less risk for bone loss as aging occurs. And for their parents, some handy notes can be found here.

 

(Oh, and you can like them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter for more helpful, healthful information!)

(Image credit: Best Bones Forever by Office of Women’s Health via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public Domain)

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

April 24, 2014

Ankles: Sprains and Pains

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For any building to be upright, it requires a solid foundation. Such is true for the human body: if what’s below the knees goes wonky it can have an effect on the body as a whole. Ankles are incredibly resilient joints but when they take a hit (or a fall or a twist) they can be problematic.

 

Ankle sprains are common, and can be seen in athletes and nonathletes alike. Sprains can result from the ankle turning from a misstep, from stepping down at an angle or from sideways movements. There are clinical rules which help determine who needs imaging- mild sprains may not need to be imaged.

 

Sprains typically result in injury to the ligaments, those soft tissue bands which connect bone to bone. If the ankle is unstable or if symptoms do not improve as expected, imaging with an MRI may be needed. This allows assessment of the bones of the ankle as well as the soft tissues, including the ligaments.

 

A fall from a height may lead to fracture or dislocation (ouch). Plain films of your ankle will be the starting point if fracture is suspected.  If a fracture is complex, CT is excellent at showing the anatomy and helping your surgeon plan treatment.

 

Achilles tendontears are often an event with a distinct injury, sometimes related to a sudden movement and abrupt tensing of the calf muscle (Remember those replays of Lebron James’ injury? Ouch!). Physical exam will often reveal a focal defect in the tendon your doctor can feel. We may want to image to see if the tendon is completely torn and the distance between the torn ends to help with surgical planning. Ultrasound can show this nicely, as can MRI.

 

Tendons about the ankle other than the Achilles can also be injured, torn or inflamed. Injuries to other ankle tendons can also be evaluated with ultrasound, although MRI is more commonly used. Tendons about the ankle include the peroneal tendons on the outer side of the ankle and the posterior tibial tendon on the inside.

 

It’s important to treat ankle injuries, because as a foundation for the body, adding a limp can lead to other problems including back pain (double ugh). If left untreated, ankle sprains can lead to chronic instability.

 

As ever, prevention is the best medicine. Some ankle strengthening exercises can be found here.

(Photo credit: Broken ankle Cast detail by FiDalwood via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

April 22, 2014

Knees: Scrapes, Twists and Tears

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Knees are famous for scrapes (and bees). Little kids play rough and tumble and when they do, they land on ‘em. Little band-aids on a child’s knees are almost – dare we say – cute. They remind us of learning to ride bikes and popsicles on summer days and swingset leaps. Luckily, kids’ knees are resilient.

 

As we get older – not so much. Knees take a beating and unfortunately they’re really only meant to bend in one direction. We could go on and on about knee maladies (arthritis anyone?) but let’s pick one: sports injuries.

 

As we graduate from learning to ride bikes to learning to ski and more, we introduce a lot more opportunities to scrape, bang, twist and torque our knees. Knee injuries are incredibly common, especially in sports. There are a variety of tissues to damage – from bone to muscle to tendons to ligaments. Imaging may be needed to see all of the complex structures.

 

With sports injuries, damage to ligaments may occur, especially with twisting or blows from the side – ligaments (connecting bone to bone) include the anterior cruciate (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligaments which cross (cruciate comes from the Latin for “cross”) the center of the knee. The medial and lateral collateral ligaments stabilize the inner and outer aspects of the knee respectively.

 

Sometimes with a twisting motion, multiple structures will be involved in the injury. MRI is an excellent means of imaging the knee, allowing us to look at bone, soft tissue and cartilage all at the same time. You can even give a good estimation of the way a knee was injured based on the pattern of injuries present on the MRI. Injury to the ACL happens in athletes of all ages. The ligament can be torn partially or completely, and knee instability in a classic pattern will often be found on clinical exam of the knee.  ACL tears are often associated with bone bruises in classic places, and may be associated with damage to the other soft tissue structures, from other ligaments to meniscal tears.

Tendons (which connect muscles to bone) may also be injured – either the quadriceps tendon  coming to the top of the patella (kneecap), or the patellar tendon, coming from the bottom of the patella.  Often the tears can be felt by your doctor on exam. Imaging, often with MRI or with ultrasound, may be necessary to see if the tear is complete and look for other injuries. Muscle injury can also occur, and is well-imaged by MRI.

The menisci are discs of cartilage between the femur and tibia which provide cushioning and which can get torn. This can cause a sensation of something locking in the knee with motion (although other things can also do that) or may just cause pain. Meniscal tears are well-seen on MRI, and may also be evaluated with arthrography.

 

As with shoulders – you want to take care of your knees and keep ‘em strong. This doesn’t mean don’t play – it just means play smart. Other things you can do to help protect your knees can be found here.

(Photo credit: trufflekneehighs by boocub via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial- NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

April 10, 2014

Bone Density: High Impact

Double Dutch Street Performance by Matsuri @ Vancouver City Centre Station by GoToVan via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)And you thought jumping rope was just for fun… Well, it is! But it also might be good for the health of your bones. We’re not saying you have to hit 332 jumps per minute, but even at a leisurely pace, a little jumping can be good for your bones.

 

As it turns out, when bones receive a moderate impact (we’re talking a moderate impact from movement like running or jumping) bones make themselves stronger.

 

In a recent study (playfully titled Physical activity and bone: may the force be with you) it was discovered that young persons, whose bones are still developing, can increase bone density with physical exercise which included moderate impact activities. The hope is that building bone density in young people will help provide protection from future bone loss issues such as osteoporosis, although further research into long-term effects is needed. And these clever scientists weren’t the only ones to find such promising results from moderate impact exercise. In another study of premenopausal women, when bones were subjected to a moderate force from jumping, hip bone density increased.

 

As we age, the risk of bone loss and all its negative side effects increases. One of the best preventives for future problems with osteoporosis is to start with strong bones. These studies show we can improve bone strength over a relatively short period of time with purposeful, moderate impact activity.

 

Want to read more? Check out this article from the New York Times, here. Hop to it!

(Photo credit: Double Dutch Street Performance by 祭 – Matsuri @ Vancouver City Centre Station by GoToVan via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

April 8, 2014

Bone Density: What Is DEXA?

Diagnostic Imaging Centers DEXA scanner

Diagnostic Imaging Centers DEXA scanner

Dual photon x-ray absorbtiometry? That sounds like something that happened to Bruce Banner (okay, those were gamma rays…). But we promise, you won’t turn green from what is more simply known as a DEXA scan.

 

A DEXA scan is also called a bone density scan. This test is used to test your bone density and determine your risk for future fracture.  This test involves a small amount of radiation and evaluates the density or strength of your bones. It can analyze different bones, but is most often used to evaluate the spine and hip.

 

An exam takes 10 minutes and is easy for most: all you have to do is hold still while lying on your back and our computers will do the rest. On the day of your exam you will be asked to avoid taking any calcium supplements as they interfere with the test. If you have metal in your back or hip like a spinal fusion rod or hip replacement your exam will be slightly different.  For these cases we use another bone for analysis, typically the forearm.

 

The test will calculate a score which estimates fracture risk. All sorts of data are taken into account, from age to gender to race, and your bone density will be compared to a healthy 30-year-old’s average.

 

Bone density results will fall into three ranges: normal, osteopenia or osteoporotic. Osteoporosis is the loss of bone mass often found in the elderly which makes bones brittle or weak and susceptible to breaking. Osteopenia indicates bone density less than expected but not yet reaching osteoporosis levels. While osteoporosis is serious with serious implications for future health, it is also treatable – and treat it is what we want for you! If you show signs of bone density loss there are a variety of medication options and lifestyle changes which can be considered.

 

While a DEXA can’t cure what ails, it can help target and identify what does so that treatment can be started to get you on the road to your best possible health!

(Photo credit: DEXA scanner at the Diagnostic Imaging Centers)

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

December 31, 2013

Nuclear Medicine: Tell me about three phase bone imaging… with Dr. Sid Crawley

November 7, 2013

What if my bone density exam shows osteopenia? – with Dr. Scott Sher

November 5, 2013

What if my bone density exam shows osteoporosis? – with Dr. Scott Sher