Posts tagged ‘common’

April 29, 2014

Case Study: Pyloric Stenosis or “Why Babies Get Ultrasounds”

pyloric stenosis

pyloric stenosis

We don’t like to expose infants to radiation, however sometimes we need to take a look inside. (Cue celebratory music…) This is why ultrasound is so fabulous! It’s real-time, harmless, noninvasive, short-lived and highly helpful.

 

Today’s case study covers an instance of an 8-week-old male infant with pyloric stenosis. Classically this disorder occurs at 2-8 weeks of age in male infants. The disorder is most common in Caucasian males and can run in families. The infants present with forceful projectile vomiting that can get progressively worse. Poor weight gain often results. Such was the case with this little one.

 

Today, we use ultrasound to image kids that are suspected of having pyloric stenosis (back in the old days we made the diagnosis with an upper GI exam done with fluoroscopy and X-rays – no longer necessary for the majority).  With ultrasound we use a probe gently placed on the baby’s abdomen to image the pylorus, a muscle which sits at the connection between the stomach and the small intestine. Ultrasound allows us to see the overdeveloped muscle that causes blockage between the stomach and the small intestine, impeding the progress of milk out of the stomach – vomiting and weight loss follow!

 

This condition is highly treatable after the diagnosis is made. Most often, simple surgery to open the muscle is used to put an infant back on track to weight gain and health. Here’s one more example of how ultrasound has impacted little lives. We love to image soundly!

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

March 6, 2014

Ultrasound for Appendix

Here is an example of appendicitis by ultrasound with a tubular darker gray structure at the site of symptoms corresponding with the inflamed appendix.

Here is an example of appendicitis by ultrasound with a tubular darker gray structure at the site of symptoms corresponding with the inflamed appendix.

Appendicitis is pretty common – about 680,000 people – both kids and adults – will be affected by appendicitis each year – that’s about 1 per minute in the US! The appendix is a blind-ending tube with no apparent function that extends off the first part of the colon or large intestine, in the right  lower part of the abdomen, near the hip bone.

Appendicitis may be diagnosed purely on physical signs and symptoms (right lower quadrant pain, focal tenderness, fever and elevated white blood cell count) in some patients. If the diagnosis is questioned and imaging is needed, there are several options. Ultrasound is a great first step because it is noninvasive, quick, easy and involves no radiation. Imaging right where the patient is symptomatic is also quite helpful and easy to do with ultrasound.

With ultrasound, images with gentle, slow, graded pushing on the area of symptoms in the right lower quadrant are obtained with a transducer or probe. Appendicitis shows up as a tubular structure that does not push out of the way or compress, often with changes in the adjacent fat from the inflammation. This will often cause the patient to say, “Ouch, that is where it hurts.” If the symptoms are NOT related to the appendix, ultrasound can also help identify other potential sources of pain in the area, such as ovarian cysts, problems with the kidney or problems with the small bowel among lots of other causes.

If the ultrasound is inconclusive but symptoms persist, a CT scan is also an option for evaluation of the right lower quadrant.

There are many causes for pain in the lower right abdomen – if you have symptoms, see your doctor. Your doctor – with or without the help of your friendly radiologist – can work to determine the cause of your pain and treatment needed to get you back to good health.