Posts tagged ‘computers’

September 17, 2014

There’s a Better Way To Calculate Body Fat (and We’ve Got It!)

3D-printed Laughing Buddha (right) by Digital Nuisance via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)Obesity and its negative effects on our collective health has been covered repeatedly in the news. There are ways of defining being overweight or obese, most based on height, weight and body mass index (BMI). Body composition is another means of analyzing percentage of body fat, and another tool to help guide and follow treatment.

 

Let’s start with the numbers: accurate weight and height are a starting point. Getting your body mass index (which you can do here once you have your height and weight) is helpful in determining whether your weight is appropriate for your height. But to be truly accurate about weight, body fat and its affect on health, knowing what percentage of your body tissue is fat specifically can be helpful. Here is where radiology can help: DEXA is the most accurate means of assessing body composition.

 

DEXA is known most commonly for measuring bone mineral density. This can identify those with osteoporosis or those beginning to show signs of bone loss. Knowing your bone mineral density is increasingly important with age, and preventing fractures is a goal.

 

DEXA (or Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry if you want to know the words behind the acronym) is the most accurate method of assessing body composition. A DEXA scan is a medical test and is considered the Gold Standard in body composition testing with over 99% accuracy. This imaging technique using low dose x-rays can evaluate bone density, fat density and lean body mass. DEXA gives a total picture of body composition, useful for planning a course of action and then seeing the success (we’ll think positive!) of those actions.

 

Eating well, exercising regularly, talking to your doctor or consulting with a dietician are all actions that can help you on the way to better numbers. Decreasing body fat percentage while maintaining healthy lean body mass is the goal. Decreasing body fat percentage is as significant as overall weight loss to your health.

 

So start with your numbers and move from there. You have the power to get yourself on the road to your best possible health! And we’re happy to help in any way we can, from sharing healthy recipes to exercise tips and tricks to advising you on your DEXA scores to cheering you on and educating you along the way! If you follow us on Pinterest you’ll see more ideas everyday!

(Image attribution: 3D-printed Laughing Buddha (right) by Digital Nuisance via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0))

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

April 8, 2014

Bone Density: What Is DEXA?

Diagnostic Imaging Centers DEXA scanner

Diagnostic Imaging Centers DEXA scanner

Dual photon x-ray absorbtiometry? That sounds like something that happened to Bruce Banner (okay, those were gamma rays…). But we promise, you won’t turn green from what is more simply known as a DEXA scan.

 

A DEXA scan is also called a bone density scan. This test is used to test your bone density and determine your risk for future fracture.  This test involves a small amount of radiation and evaluates the density or strength of your bones. It can analyze different bones, but is most often used to evaluate the spine and hip.

 

An exam takes 10 minutes and is easy for most: all you have to do is hold still while lying on your back and our computers will do the rest. On the day of your exam you will be asked to avoid taking any calcium supplements as they interfere with the test. If you have metal in your back or hip like a spinal fusion rod or hip replacement your exam will be slightly different.  For these cases we use another bone for analysis, typically the forearm.

 

The test will calculate a score which estimates fracture risk. All sorts of data are taken into account, from age to gender to race, and your bone density will be compared to a healthy 30-year-old’s average.

 

Bone density results will fall into three ranges: normal, osteopenia or osteoporotic. Osteoporosis is the loss of bone mass often found in the elderly which makes bones brittle or weak and susceptible to breaking. Osteopenia indicates bone density less than expected but not yet reaching osteoporosis levels. While osteoporosis is serious with serious implications for future health, it is also treatable – and treat it is what we want for you! If you show signs of bone density loss there are a variety of medication options and lifestyle changes which can be considered.

 

While a DEXA can’t cure what ails, it can help target and identify what does so that treatment can be started to get you on the road to your best possible health!

(Photo credit: DEXA scanner at the Diagnostic Imaging Centers)

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

April 3, 2014

Brain Boost: Kids and Screens

Computer by yoshimov via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Computer by yoshimov via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Bringing children into the world brings organized chaos to your life. There are things they do on a regular basis, like eat and sleep – and things we cannot regulate at all, like moods, personalities and learning curves. There is one certainty – they will keep growing and changing, especially when you think you’ve figured them out.

 

As parents, we struggle to manage the unmanageable. We try to get them to go to bed at a certain hour, we try to get them to eat at dinner time and we try to get them to want healthy foods.

 

In the middle of all that trying comes another interruption to their cycles: technology. It entertains the cranky, exercises the brain and distracts, separating the user from the world outside the screen. It’s a gift and a burden.

 

Recently, the Washington Post wrote an excellent article on kids and screentime. In short, just as we carefully monitor their diets for a balance of good food and the occasional treat, absorption of a healthy media diet is in order too.

 

It doesn’t take a scientific study to know that there are times to turn off the television and go get some playful exercise outdoors (but there are many). But as iPads have turned into flipbooks for three year olds and texting is more than just a game to many teenagers, it can become hard to judge just how much time spent on these devices is time well spent.

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics has some great guidelines they’ve researched when it comes to the media intake of children. When it comes to hard facts and numbers, here’s what we learned from writer Kendall Powell:

 

Develop a family media plan and stick to it!

 

●Enforce consistent rules about screen time from the start.

●Keep all screens and Internet out of the bedroom.

●Impose meal time restrictions and bedtime curfews for everyone’s devices (yours too!).

●Watch or explore media content with children.

 

While wrangling the chaos of a household is hard (to put it mildly), managing a little more of what goes into the heads and hands of little ones can produce happier, healthier children. And that’s an effort well worth making.

 

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!