Posts tagged ‘education’

November 11, 2015

November Is Lung Cancer Awareness Month!

Sheer_w_gold_ribbon[1]November is lung cancer awareness month, highlighting the leading cancer killer of adult men and women. Over 150,000 deaths from lung cancer are estimated to occur in women and men in 2015 making lung cancer the leading cause of cancer deaths by far. Only 15% of lung cancers are found at a localized stage meaning low survival rates.

What are the facts about this killer?

  • Tobacco use is the leading cause of lung cancer. Around 90% of lung cancers are related to smoking.
  • Risk for lung cancer from smoking are related to the length of time and amount of smoking. Those who have smoked the equivalent of 30 pack years or more are at the greatest risk but even a history of 10 pack years of smoking means a higher risk of lung cancer.
  • Other risk factors include second hand smoke exposure, exposure to asbestos and exposure to radon gas. Family history may play a role in some.
  • Signs and symptoms from lung cancer are nonspecific, overlapping with many non-cancerous conditions and include: cough, shortness of breath, chest pain and coughing up blood.

What can we do to beat this killer?

  • Smoking cessation is key! If you smoke, your doctor has resources that can help you or your loved one quit.
  • Finding lung cancer earlier means improved survival.
  • Screening with low dose CT can lower the risk of dying from lung cancer with the largest study showing a decrease in the risk of death by at least 20%.

Who should undergo screening?

  • Current smokers or those who have quit smoking in the last 15 years.
  • Those who have smoked an equivalent of 30 pack years (for example, smoking 1 pack per day for 30 years or 2 packs per day for 15 years, etc.).
  • Smokers aged 55-75.

Screening will occur with a low dose CT performed every year while criteria are met. Screening should be performed as part of a total program aimed at reducing the risk of lung cancer, meaning smoking cessation is a key part.

This November, let’s spread the word: lung cancer is a leading cancer killer, one which we CAN do something about. If you are at risk, get screened with low dose CT yearly and reduce your risk by joining the ranks of the non-smokers.

(Image credit: Sheer w gold ribbon by Niki K, copyright Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported)

July 31, 2015

Vaccines Save Lives!

Vaccines save lives. In a world before them, many people of all ages died from common and painful diseases. The adoption of vaccines into society brought about a radical change – a reduction of mortality across all ages, especially true for children. For pediatricians who lived through this medical revolution, it was time for cheers and champagne.

Now vaccines are again in the news – this time for sad reasons. Not everyone is getting them, and as a result, people are suffering. The good news is: we have the power to affect change. We can share the important message that vaccines work and help make sure that everyone gets their vaccines.

This is why Diagnostic Imaging Centers is proud to support Vaccines Work KC! On Sunday, August 2nd from 2p-4p at Mill Creek Park (better known as J. C. Nichols Fountain on the Plaza).

We believe in the power of knowledge and medicine – that the two can go hand in hand and make the world a healthier and safer place for all. We invite you to join us for family fun and sharing of knowledge – see you Sunday!

More details can be found here.

 

 

“Immunizations are the cornerstone of public health. I’ve seen many of the  diseases of the past  that are preventable with immunizations. When I was a young doctor I saw some of  these diseases and the damage they would do to children. I’ve seen countless lives saved by vaccines.

We don’t just vaccinate  for our health and safety, but for that of our children and our grandchildren and their children too. If we don’t continue to vaccinate today, the diseases like polio and meningitis that we have vaccines for and can eradicate will return to cripple, infect or kill children in the future. The future generations will  be asking why we didn’t do more to put an end to these diseases like we have done for smallpox.

“An act of prevention is worth a pound of cure!” This is why it’s important to get the word out and take care of our children now. We need to vaccinate everyone to put an end to diseases that are preventable! Vaccines work!”

Dr. Edna Perez-Koury

June 30, 2015

Farewell For Now… but You’ll Always Be an F.O.E.

Screenshot (7)We don’t like goodbyes around these parts, but we do occasionally find ourselves saying “so long for now and see you again soon…” At the end of July, Diagnostic Imaging Centers will bid farewell to Dr. Edwin Herman.

If you have been one of our regular patients over his past 45 years of service, you may well have been dubbed an “F.O.E.” – that would be “Friend of Eddie.” Dr. Herman loves his patients and colleagues dearly, and will gladly tell you so, given half the chance. And we love him back!

Dr. Herman recently announced his impending retirement via a company-wide email, which we are happy to share. Not only does he talk about the amazing history of Diagnostic Imaging Centers, he also talks about the amazing history of radiology. Progress in our field of expertise has been profound over the years – and amazingly fast (time flies!).

Below are his characteristically kind words and thoughts on his time in radiology, and at Diagnostic Imaging Centers:

You have all heard the “RUMOR.” It is a fact. I am retiring July 29th.

In 1970, I joined Radiologists, Inc., which was the forerunner of Diagnostic Imaging Centers. There were 4 of us at the time and Dr. Jeff was still in diapers.

In those days, we were “wet developing” x-rays (perhaps you have heard the phrase, “Can I get a “wet read on that?”)  We were wearing goggles during fluoroscopy and special procedures. We interpreted mammograms on Xerox paper. Nuclear medicine and ultrasound were in their infancy. It is shocking to see what once passed as advanced imaging. I have seen it all.

Over the past 45 years, we, Diagnostic Imaging Centers, have been on the leading edge of advances in imaging which, in 1970, we could never have conceived. CT and MRI have revolutionized the ability of radiologist to diagnose diseases far earlier and with greater accuracy The development of ultrasound and its subsequent improvements have particularly improved the field of women’s imaging. Nuclear medicine maintains a valuable role in the diagnosis of a multitude of disease processes. Just when I thought I was finished learning new technologies, along comes 3D Mammography, which gives us the ability to detect breast cancer at an earlier stage and with even greater sensitivity.

In 1985 we opened the College and Nall clinic. At great corporate and personal risk, we unveiled the first MRI in Johnson County and started the first full-service outpatient imaging center in the greater Kansas City area. It wasn’t easy in the beginning. At first we were seeing only 10-14 patients a day. Needless to say, we had a lot of time on our hands. It is amazing that today we perform over 1,000 exams per day. We have touched the lives of so many people.

As the Radiologists, Inc./Diagnostic Imaging Centers business model began to thrive, we subsequently opened many more imaging centers, serving the entire KC area.

WHAT A WONDERFUL JOURNEY IT HAS BEEN!!!!

This place is very special in so many ways and means so much to me and to my entire family. We have grown up here. In fact, we have grown older here.

I have been fortunate to have such wonderful partners, who will always be my colleagues and friends. I am so proud of their expertise, ability, compassion, and dedication to our patients. They are vital to our continued success.

The support staff, including the technologists, administrators, editors, medical records, front desk, couriers, help desk, public relations, and all are very dear to me! You keep a smile on my face and have played such an important role in my life.

Continue to take care of the ”F.O.E.s”. They really care about the amazing service they always receive. I have listened to them rave about all of you for decades. Never lose the drive to always provide that quality PATIENT-FIRST service. That is what separates us from all the rest.

I am confident that Diagnostic Imaging Centers will continue to be the BEST!!!!!

I am so proud of all of you. I wish you much success and lives filled with health, happiness, and good fortune.

Diagnostic Imaging Centers and its employees will always be in my heart.

THANK YOU FOR ACCOMPANYING ME ON MY JOURNEY.

I LUV you all so much.

EMH

June 17, 2015

Knock Out Lung Cancer with Low Dose CTs

Patient-Flyer---Lung-CT-UMKC

April 16, 2015

All About the Belly: Abdominal Ultrasound

uplifting buddha by faria! via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Bellies are where we keep things, from laughter to turkey dinners to babies. But bellies hold more than that! The anatomically correct name for that part of the body is the abdomen. The abdomen is home to important organs including the liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, and towards the back, the kidneys.

So when we as radiologists are asked to look into someone’s belly, we have a lot to check out! Pain in the abdomen can arise from issues with any of the  organs, the blood vessels and ducts or even the supporting tissues. Because there is so much to see, we select our tools very carefully – starting with ultrasound technology.

Ultrasound is great because images are made with harmless sound waves instead of radiation. It is fast, noninvasive, and painless. The most uncomfortable one might feel is when the tender area is evaluated in the scan. In short, it’s an easy exam.

Once the gel is applied, a transducer (fancy name for a probe) is rubbed gently across the skin. A computer calculates black, white and grey images in real time, instantly showing on a screen. Your radiologist can then interpret those images and determine what’s healthy, or what needs to be healed.

When you have a focal symptom, such as a pain, we can look specifically at the area in question, even viewing it with you in different positions (as in, it hurts right here when I do this!). Flank pain (“renal colic”), especially in young patients, those who are pregnant, and those with known kidney stones are excellent candidates for abdominal ultrasound. Right upper quadrant pain or pain after eating fatty foods can be due to gallstones – best seen and evaluated by ultrasound. Right lower quadrant pain can be an indicator of appendicitis and in kids and young adults ultrasound is a great first imaging test.

No matter what the diagnosis, it’s important to take care of your belly – and all that it holds! Ultrasound is a powerful tool in helping us help you.

(Image Credit: uplifting buddha by faria! via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

April 14, 2015

We Love… KC C.A.R.E. One-Day Free Clinic!

the dr is inKansas City is hosting a FREE one-day clinic, open to all who need it. Here are the details:

For the medically underserved in the area, a team of local medical organizations including Diagnostic Imaging Centers is coming together to provide free healthcare on Saturday, April 18th at Bartle Hall from 10a-5p. No one will be turned away.

The National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics in conjunction with the Kansas City C.A.R.E. (Communities Are Responding Everyday) Clinic is bringing this special day to those in need in Kansas City. We are proud to be working with these great organizations.

At the C.A.R.E. Clinic, services offered will include: medical exams, medical tests (diabetes, cholesterol, pregnancy, HIV and EKGs), prescription medications, kidney screenings, and behavioral health care. Additionally, services to help with health insurance navigation, follow-up care, and health education are available that day.

While mobile mammography units will not be available on-site the day of the event, vouchers will be provided to women who cannot afford a mammogram with the vouchers providing a free mammogram at any of Diagnostic Imaging Centers’ six conveniently located outpatient offices.

The free screening mammogram vouchers are being provided thanks to our partnership with the Breast Cancer Survivors Foundation which is committed to “helping women survive.” The Foundation offers grants to clinics nationwide for screenings and mammograms for the uninsured and underinsured.

With scheduled or walk-in services and immediate results, Diagnostic Imaging Centers aims to take some of the frustration and worry out of breast imaging. Quick and easy, it’s approximately 20 minutes from check-in to check-out for a screening mammogram. Almost worry free!

To date, the Breast Cancer Survivors Foundation has helped over 11,000 women receive breast care since its inception in 2010. To learn more about their services, please visit www.breastcancersurvivor.org. Diagnostic Imaging Centers takes care of the women of Kansas City to the tune of over 50,000 mammograms per year- a number that has been steadily increasing over the last fifty plus years of service to our community.

More details about the C.A.R.E. Clinic can be found here. To learn more about breast health, visit www.mammographykc.com.

February 11, 2015

3D Mammography Is HERE!

February 9, 2015

Medicare: A Life-Saving Screening Now Covered

CT chestThis past week brought great news for Medicare patients! Medicare is now covering the cost of low-dose screening CT chests in selected patients. Screening with low-dose CT chest has been shown to save lives with the ability to diagnose lung cancer when it is small and more treatable.

Here are the details:

WHO is covered?

  •         Must be between 55 and 77 years of age
  •         Must be a current smoker or have quit smoking in the past 15 years
  •         Must have smoked the equivalent of 30 pack years (that means 1 pack a day for 30 years or 2 packs per day for 15 years, or any other such combination)

WHAT steps are needed for coverage?

  •         Must have a  visit with their referring physician or nurse practitioner prior to the CT for “a shared-decision making/smoking cessation counseling session prior to being referred for their first screening exam.” This is not needed for studies after the first.
  •         Must have an order from the doctor or nurse practitioner.

HOW is the test done?

  •         This is a quick,  non-contrast CT of the chest done with low dose.
  •         This is part of a total program to reduce lung cancer risk, including the most important part – a goal of smoking cessation.
  •         The test is a screening test – meaning, if something is found (about 10% of the time) something else may be recommended – this could mean further imaging, including a CT chest with contrast, PET imaging or short-term follow up CT studies, or could mean a lung biopsy.
  •         This is intended to be repeated annually.
  •         Sites providing coverage must meet many requirements, including specifications on dose and follow-up of patients.

The possibility of decreasing the number of deaths from lung cancer by getting patients into a screening program is exciting.

 

If you or someone you know fits the above criteria, get an appointment with your doctor.  If it’s a loved one, you may be the voice that prompts their action!

 

Screening of smokers with low-dose CT chest is a huge leap forward in the fight against lung cancer.

 

 

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

December 31, 2014

Wishing you a safe and happy new year!

DIC blog new years eve

December 23, 2014

Happy Holidays from Diagnostic Imaging Centers!

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