Posts tagged ‘images.’

May 14, 2014

What’s Up with Your Neck? (and just below…)

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Have pain in your neck or upper back? You are not alone! While less common than low back pain, pain in the neck is a common complaint leading to doctor’s office visits. Pain in the upper back is somewhat less common, but we will include it in our discussion for completeness.

 

In a recent post we talked about imaging of the lumbar spine, the lower portion of the spine which sits behind your belly.  Much of the imaging for the rest of the spine is similar to what is done for the lumbar region.

 

The cervical spine (coming from the Latin word for neck) is sometimes referred to as the C spine. It consists of the first seven vertebrae (from the skull) and the cartilage discs between them, in addition to adjacent ligaments and muscles. A lot of motion (up,down, around!) occurs in this part of the spine during the day, so this is a common spot for symptoms of overuse or muscle strain to occur.

 

Patients with cervical spine problems may have pain in the neck with or without symptoms in the upper arms/shoulders – this can be pain or can be nerve type symptoms like numbness or tingling. How far the symptoms go down your arm can help indicate the level of involvement in the cervical spine.

 

The T Spine is the thoracic spine consisting of the 12 vertebral bodies, discs, adjacent muscles and ligaments at chest level. There is less movement of the spine at this level, so symptoms here are less common. Symptoms of thoracic spine problems may include pain in the upper back, shoulders, arms, or to the sides of the chest. Nerve symptoms like numbness, tingling or weakness may also be present.

 

As in the lumbar spine, there are a lot of age-related changes involving the discs and/or the adjacent bones; these may or may not be related to the patient’s symptoms. Imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine is generally performed after careful history and physical examination, and may be delayed to see if a trial of conservative treatment improves symptoms. Imaging immediately may be warranted if there are serious symptoms such as major trauma, weight loss, or nerve symptoms, particularly weakness of the arms or legs.

The spectrum of problems in the cervical and thoracic spine is similar to that in the lumbar spine and can include disc displacement, fractures, and muscle strain. Less common causes of neck and upper back symptoms include disease in the spinal cord itself, spinal cord tumors and things like multiple sclerosis. Note that the spinal cord ends at approximately the upper lumbar level; therefore, these problems do not directly affect the lumbar spine.

 

Imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine is similar to that for the lumbar spine. X-ray, CT and MRI can all be used to diagnose problems.Plain films or x-rays may be the best starting point as they can show alignment and fractures. X-rays can also show any narrowing in the spaces between the vertebra indicating disc disease. A CT shows bones and adjacent tissues and is the test of choice if we are concerned about fractures. CT can see the cord and nerve roots if we do it after a myelogram (more commonly done with C spine than with the T spine). Last, an MRI can show the spinal cord, nerve roots and discs and how they relate.

 

Ultimately, imaging of the neck and upper spine may be helpful to determine the proper course of action to get you on the road to your best possible health!

(Image credit: Illu vertebral column via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public Domain)


Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

May 12, 2014

Diagnostic Imaging Centers: We’d Like to Introduce Ourselves (ALL of Us!)

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Over the past year, we’ve put a lot of love and energy into providing the best imaging information for our growing readership. We blog at mammographykc.com about breast health and not just cancer but overall breast health. Then we write here at diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com to discuss more general radiology topics from when, to what, to why we image the human body and how we keep you safe and healthy.  

 

We’ve introduced the types of imaging we use (MRI, CT etc.) and introduced many of our radiologists at Diagnostic Imaging Centers. We’ve raved about our love for our whole team (techs and all of our staff are awesome people!). Our jobs revolve around people, our jobs involve working together, our jobs are our pleasure and a labor of love. We strive to offer the best in outpatient imaging care.

 

During the next few weeks, we’ll be introducing each of our six facilities and our colleagues who make them so special. We will highlight many of our employees individually so you can get to know us better.    

 

So stay tuned and on Mondays we’ll be bringing you more of the great radiology information you’re accustomed to here and even more! From Overland Park to Olathe, from Lee’s Summit to Independence and the Plaza to the Northland, Diagnostic Imaging Centers is here for you – online and in real life too. Cheers to your best possible health!

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!