Posts tagged ‘kids’

July 31, 2015

Vaccines Save Lives!

Vaccines save lives. In a world before them, many people of all ages died from common and painful diseases. The adoption of vaccines into society brought about a radical change – a reduction of mortality across all ages, especially true for children. For pediatricians who lived through this medical revolution, it was time for cheers and champagne.

Now vaccines are again in the news – this time for sad reasons. Not everyone is getting them, and as a result, people are suffering. The good news is: we have the power to affect change. We can share the important message that vaccines work and help make sure that everyone gets their vaccines.

This is why Diagnostic Imaging Centers is proud to support Vaccines Work KC! On Sunday, August 2nd from 2p-4p at Mill Creek Park (better known as J. C. Nichols Fountain on the Plaza).

We believe in the power of knowledge and medicine – that the two can go hand in hand and make the world a healthier and safer place for all. We invite you to join us for family fun and sharing of knowledge – see you Sunday!

More details can be found here.

 

 

“Immunizations are the cornerstone of public health. I’ve seen many of the  diseases of the past  that are preventable with immunizations. When I was a young doctor I saw some of  these diseases and the damage they would do to children. I’ve seen countless lives saved by vaccines.

We don’t just vaccinate  for our health and safety, but for that of our children and our grandchildren and their children too. If we don’t continue to vaccinate today, the diseases like polio and meningitis that we have vaccines for and can eradicate will return to cripple, infect or kill children in the future. The future generations will  be asking why we didn’t do more to put an end to these diseases like we have done for smallpox.

“An act of prevention is worth a pound of cure!” This is why it’s important to get the word out and take care of our children now. We need to vaccinate everyone to put an end to diseases that are preventable! Vaccines work!”

Dr. Edna Perez-Koury

April 16, 2015

All About the Belly: Abdominal Ultrasound

uplifting buddha by faria! via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Bellies are where we keep things, from laughter to turkey dinners to babies. But bellies hold more than that! The anatomically correct name for that part of the body is the abdomen. The abdomen is home to important organs including the liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, and towards the back, the kidneys.

So when we as radiologists are asked to look into someone’s belly, we have a lot to check out! Pain in the abdomen can arise from issues with any of the  organs, the blood vessels and ducts or even the supporting tissues. Because there is so much to see, we select our tools very carefully – starting with ultrasound technology.

Ultrasound is great because images are made with harmless sound waves instead of radiation. It is fast, noninvasive, and painless. The most uncomfortable one might feel is when the tender area is evaluated in the scan. In short, it’s an easy exam.

Once the gel is applied, a transducer (fancy name for a probe) is rubbed gently across the skin. A computer calculates black, white and grey images in real time, instantly showing on a screen. Your radiologist can then interpret those images and determine what’s healthy, or what needs to be healed.

When you have a focal symptom, such as a pain, we can look specifically at the area in question, even viewing it with you in different positions (as in, it hurts right here when I do this!). Flank pain (“renal colic”), especially in young patients, those who are pregnant, and those with known kidney stones are excellent candidates for abdominal ultrasound. Right upper quadrant pain or pain after eating fatty foods can be due to gallstones – best seen and evaluated by ultrasound. Right lower quadrant pain can be an indicator of appendicitis and in kids and young adults ultrasound is a great first imaging test.

No matter what the diagnosis, it’s important to take care of your belly – and all that it holds! Ultrasound is a powerful tool in helping us help you.

(Image Credit: uplifting buddha by faria! via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

June 27, 2014

Health Heroes: Soccer and Child Safety

soccer head case by woodleywonderworks via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)It’s World Cup season and everyone’s having fun (minus a few scrapes, bruises and one bite)! The excitement is contagious and kids and adults alike are running home to grab their own soccer balls and bouncing into the nearest park.

 

What’s not to love?  Running, jumping, kicking… hitting your head?! What? Yes, in a hands-free sport, “headers” are allowed. However new research (and honestly some older research too) is showing this type of soccer play is dangerous, especially to kids.

 

While Abby Wambach made it look cool, it turns out scoring a goal with hard force to the skull can hurt the brain. This is not so cool – particularly for those below the age of 14, when the brain is still developing.

 

A new initiative called Parents and Pros for Safer Soccer has been formed in conjunction with the Sports Legacy Institute and the Santa Clara Institute of Sports Law and Ethics and a number of world renowned soccer players including Brandi Chastain, Cindy Parlow Cone and Joy Fawcett.

 

Parlow Cone was forced to retire from soccer due to head injuries and fatigue – all resulting from a series of concussions across time from headers. She said that when she was a child practicing headers, she thought that “seeing stars” was normal for everyone. Well, it may be a common experience to see stars when subjected to head trauma, but head trauma shouldn’t be so common. Heading is the leading cause of serious injuries in the sport.

 

So during this time of soccer-mania when kids are developing healthy heroes, it’s a good time to note what traits to emulate and what’s age-appropriate for the sport. In this case, no headers for those young developing brains!

 

For more on the topic, the Times has a great article, here.

(Image credit: soccer head case by woodleywonderworks via Flickr Copyright Creative CommonsAttribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

NOTES:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/25/sports/worldcup/us-womens-soccer-stars-take-lead-on-risks-of-heading.html?_r=0

June 4, 2014

We Love… Best Bones Forever!

Best Bones Forever by Office of Women's Health via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public DomainAs doctors, we find many people and organizations we love – from patients who we care about deeply to nonprofits that are assisting others on the road to their best possible health. Today we’d like to highlight a really great initiative: Best Bones Forever!

 

Best Bones Forever focuses on the bone health of young girls with the hope of avoiding bone health issues later in life. You know the old saying about an ounce of prevention being worth a pound of cure – well, it’s true! Taking care of yourselves when you are young can help avoid a world of aches further down the line.

 

An initiative of the Office of Women’s Health, the hope is to help prevent conditions like osteoporosis, or loss of bone mass that affects many elderly women. Bone loss can lead to a higher risk of fractures which can be associated with life-threatening complications and side effects which have a profound impact on quality of life. As it turns out, keeping bones strong now means having stronger bones in the future. So whether it’s exercise or a diet with the proper nutrition, the aim is to help girls develop a lifestyle of healthiness that will last them a lifetime and result in less risk for bone loss as aging occurs. And for their parents, some handy notes can be found here.

 

(Oh, and you can like them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter for more helpful, healthful information!)

(Image credit: Best Bones Forever by Office of Women’s Health via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public Domain)

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

April 3, 2014

Brain Boost: Kids and Screens

Computer by yoshimov via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Computer by yoshimov via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Bringing children into the world brings organized chaos to your life. There are things they do on a regular basis, like eat and sleep – and things we cannot regulate at all, like moods, personalities and learning curves. There is one certainty – they will keep growing and changing, especially when you think you’ve figured them out.

 

As parents, we struggle to manage the unmanageable. We try to get them to go to bed at a certain hour, we try to get them to eat at dinner time and we try to get them to want healthy foods.

 

In the middle of all that trying comes another interruption to their cycles: technology. It entertains the cranky, exercises the brain and distracts, separating the user from the world outside the screen. It’s a gift and a burden.

 

Recently, the Washington Post wrote an excellent article on kids and screentime. In short, just as we carefully monitor their diets for a balance of good food and the occasional treat, absorption of a healthy media diet is in order too.

 

It doesn’t take a scientific study to know that there are times to turn off the television and go get some playful exercise outdoors (but there are many). But as iPads have turned into flipbooks for three year olds and texting is more than just a game to many teenagers, it can become hard to judge just how much time spent on these devices is time well spent.

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics has some great guidelines they’ve researched when it comes to the media intake of children. When it comes to hard facts and numbers, here’s what we learned from writer Kendall Powell:

 

Develop a family media plan and stick to it!

 

●Enforce consistent rules about screen time from the start.

●Keep all screens and Internet out of the bedroom.

●Impose meal time restrictions and bedtime curfews for everyone’s devices (yours too!).

●Watch or explore media content with children.

 

While wrangling the chaos of a household is hard (to put it mildly), managing a little more of what goes into the heads and hands of little ones can produce happier, healthier children. And that’s an effort well worth making.

 

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!