Posts tagged ‘metal’

October 9, 2014

MRI: Not If You’re the Tin Man

Tin Woodman by William Wallace Denslow via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public DomainWhat are the risks of an MRI?

The main risks of MRI come from the fact that the machine is made up of a giant magnet – which is never turned off.

 

Safety for MRI studies relies on removing any metal on your body and fully understanding the impact of any metal within your body. Many types of metal implants, like joint replacements, are not a problem and patients with them can safely undergo MRI.

 

Some battery operated implants, like most pacemakers and many neurostimulators, can be adversely affected when exposed to the magnet. The safety of any implanted surgical device or metal should be thoroughly discussed before the exam – preferably at the time of scheduling.

 

On the day of the procedure, removing all metal (all hairpins included!) prior to entering the MRI suite is important for the safety of you, the technologist and the machine. No metal in clothing, no metal in pockets, no watches or phones!

 

The other main risk of MRI comes from those studies that require the injection of IV contrast. This allows us to evaluate blood vessels and the vascularity of organs and masses. This contrast contains gadolinium which is a heavy metal. Allergies or reactions can occur, although rarely. Gadolinium contrast materials should be used with caution in those at risk for kidney disease. You will be screened for the possibility of kidney disease, and your kidney function may be evaluated with a simple blood test before we give you the contrast if you have risk factors.

 

MRI is an amazing technology but requires strict safety precautions for everyone. We’ll be writing more about MRIs and the claustrophobic patient in our next post – stay tuned!

(Image credit: Tin Woodman by William Wallace Denslow via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public Domain)

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

August 4, 2014

We Love… Get Your Rear In Gear!

Katie Couric VF 2012 Shankbone 2 by via david_shankbone Flickr Copright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)To end this series on GI imaging, we thought we’d shine a light of hope and health by talking about an organization we love… Colon Cancer Coalition!

 

This is an amazing group of people dedicated to the knowledge that early detection of colon cancer saves lives! Their mission?

 

“Empower local communities to promote prevention and early detection of colon cancer and to provide support to those affected.”

 

Katie Couric, through her own personal loss and resilience, has helped make colorectal cancer a nationally known and talked about  issue (and for this we are grateful). The Colon Cancer Coalition reminds us to Get Your Rear In Gear! This program in cities across the US funnels money back into the participating cities, supporting local education and screening efforts. Check for events in your community here.

 

Early detection is the key to saving lives from colon cancer which is a largely preventable disease – in most cases, colon cancer starts from small growths called polyps. If these are found early, no colon cancer will develop! From a healthy diet and exercise to regular check-ups and knowing the signs of colon cancer, we can all make a difference. Regular screening with colonoscopy at age 50 for folks of average risk can and will make a difference.

 

Catch up with the Coalition on Twitter. (We follow them too.)

 

Time to celebrate life – and kick cancer’s butt!

 

 

(Image credit: Katie Couric VF 2012 Shankbone 2 by david_shankbone via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

 

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

July 16, 2014

Upper GI Pain and Imaging

UGI imagingEver wondered what happens when you swallow or what your stomach looks like? Upper GI (gastrointestinal) and esophagrams are tests used to assess  the first part of the gastrointestinal system and can be used to answer these questions and much more.

 

Why would you need one of these tests?

These exams may be used for a variety of symptoms including but not limited to:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Epigastric pain
  • Heartburn or other symptoms of reflux disease including chest pain or discomfort, a burning sensation, or excessive burping; more unusual symptoms of reflux can include sinusitis, anosmia (loss of smell), aspiration, and chronic cough.
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Choking
  • Vomiting
  • Blood in stools
  • Ulcers

 

Prior to the study:

It is very important that a patient coming in for an upper GI imaging procedure not eat or drink anything after midnight the day before the exam. In order to look at the structures and anatomy, the stomach and esophagus must be empty. Even a small amount of water can keep the contrast material from coating and sticking to the lining of the structures which would limit what the radiologist can see. Due to radiation exposure UGI imaging is not used in women who are or may be pregnant.

 

It is okay to eat and drink before an esophagram.

 

You will change into a gown, removing all clothing that has metal. We don’t want metal buttons, zippers or underwires hiding any of your lovely GI structures!

How are the tests done?

For an UGI we start with a preliminary x-ray or image of the abdomen- this makes sure there is no blockage before we begin the test. In order to optimally see your GI tract on x-ray using fluoroscopy, we have to give you a contrast material by mouth. General GI imaging can be done with contrast material such as barium and crystals of gas – the barium lines the esophagus (the connection from the mouth to the stomach) and the stomach; the crystals create gas which expands the organs, allowing radiologists to beautifully see the mucosal lining.

 

The contrast travels thru the pharynx, esophagus, stomach and duodenum; observing real-time with fluoroscopy allows us to see function as well as anatomy.

 

Images are obtained of all parts of the upper GI tract, usually starting with you positioned upright and then horizontal. fluoroscopy allows a real time look at what is happening.  X-ray images are also recorded for better detail.

 

For an esophagram, we focus on the pharynx and esophagus only, using oral contrast agents, gas and sometimes foods like crackers coated with barium paste.

 

What can be found using these tests?

  • masses- anywhere along the upper GI tract; these can be benign like polyps or cancerous;
  • ulcers (gastric or duodenal);
  • hiatal hernia (a condition where the stomach is positioned above the diaphragm predisposing to reflux disease and it’s complications like Barrett’s esophagus which is a pre-cancerous condition; this is one of the reasons to not ignore your reflux symptoms!);
  • reflux -we can see the barium going from the stomach back up into the esophagus- we will try different positions and maneuvers to try to elicit reflux;
  • esophagitis or gastritis-conditions of inflammation from many different causes;
  • congenital abnormalities-sometimes the upper GI tract is not connected normally or there may be congenital cysts or masses along the upper GI tract;
  • motility disorders- most often of the esophagus; imaging real-time allows us to see how your upper GI tract is functioning
  • swallowing disorders

What happens after the test?

The radiologist may be able to discuss some of your results at the end of the test. A final report will be made by your radiologist after reviewing all of the images, with the official report going to your doctor.

 

We will ask that you drink lots of fluids to help flush the barium out of the system! (Besides, drinking water is good for you no matter what!). You can resume your normal diet immediately.

 

Upper GI exams can result in amazing images and can be a key to diagnosis of a wide variety of conditions. Seeing your body in action helps us keep you on the road to your best possible health!

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

October 15, 2013

For a CT scan: do I have to remove jewelry, as I would for an MRI? with Dr. Scott Sher