Posts tagged ‘MR’

August 4, 2014

We Love… Get Your Rear In Gear!

Katie Couric VF 2012 Shankbone 2 by via david_shankbone Flickr Copright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)To end this series on GI imaging, we thought we’d shine a light of hope and health by talking about an organization we love… Colon Cancer Coalition!

 

This is an amazing group of people dedicated to the knowledge that early detection of colon cancer saves lives! Their mission?

 

“Empower local communities to promote prevention and early detection of colon cancer and to provide support to those affected.”

 

Katie Couric, through her own personal loss and resilience, has helped make colorectal cancer a nationally known and talked about  issue (and for this we are grateful). The Colon Cancer Coalition reminds us to Get Your Rear In Gear! This program in cities across the US funnels money back into the participating cities, supporting local education and screening efforts. Check for events in your community here.

 

Early detection is the key to saving lives from colon cancer which is a largely preventable disease – in most cases, colon cancer starts from small growths called polyps. If these are found early, no colon cancer will develop! From a healthy diet and exercise to regular check-ups and knowing the signs of colon cancer, we can all make a difference. Regular screening with colonoscopy at age 50 for folks of average risk can and will make a difference.

 

Catch up with the Coalition on Twitter. (We follow them too.)

 

Time to celebrate life – and kick cancer’s butt!

 

 

(Image credit: Katie Couric VF 2012 Shankbone 2 by david_shankbone via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

 

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

July 30, 2014

MR Enterography

MR enterographyWhen investigating issues of the abdomen and intestines, there are multiple options, including small bowel series, small bowel enteroclysis and CT or MR enterography (entero- meaning intestine, our linguistic lesson for the day!).

 

Why would you need MR enterography?

 

MR enterography is performed for many of the same reasons as CT enterography. As with each imaging modality, there are nuances and benefits from the different techniques.

 

One of the reasons a patient may come in for MR enterography is due to an iodine allergy (iodine is the IV contrast agent for CT). MR technology uses a different IV contrast agent, one containing gadolinium.

 

Additionally, MR technology uses no radiation. This can be beneficial when the patient is pregnant (although only done in pregnancy after the first trimester). It is an ideal means for assessing younger patients with inflammatory bowel disease who may face the need for frequent, repeated imaging of the intestine.

 

How does a patient prepare for MR enterography?

 

Preparation for MR enterography is done similar to the CT version – fasting for up to 4 hours before the examination.

 

What can be expected when you have MR enterography?

 

As always, remember your basic MRI safety – no metal can enter the MR suite – this means all clothing with metal must be removed.

 

MR enterography relies on adequate distention of the small bowel, usually using the same oral contrast agent containing iodine as for CT enterography. Images of the abdomen and pelvis will be obtained while IV contrast containing gadolinium is injected. The imaging time is longer for MRI than for CT, usually close to 30 minutes total for MR. Holding still is important as any motion will cause loss of detail.

 

What can we find with MR enterography?

 

This can show vascular lesions of the wall of the GI tract, masses and mucosal lesions as can be seen with inflammatory bowel disease. It also allows us to see detail in the bowel wall and in the adjacent soft tissues. Fistulas (abnormal communications from bowel loops), strictures and blockages, and abscesses can be seen in patients, often in those with inflammatory bowel disease. Problems with the blood vessels going to the bowel will be shown, such as narrowings or aneurysms.

 

And after the exam?

 

To flush the excess contrast from your system – drink lots of water!

 

MR enterography is one more tool in the arsenal for imaging the small intestines able to produce beautiful images helping us keep you on the path to your best health.

 

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

April 15, 2014

Shoulders, Knees and Toes, Knees and Toes

Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes by james.swenson13 via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Over the next few posts we’re going to highlight some common injuries affecting familiar joints. As the title suggests, we’re starting near the top.

 

But before we get ahead of ourselves and start talking about these individual parts, let’s talk about how we image them…

 

There are many techniques for imaging the body, and the ones we use depend upon the type of injury and the most likely tissues injured. Here’s a gimme: broken bones? We’ll start with an x-ray – perhaps a CT if it’s complex. Here’s a not-so-gimme: soft tissue injury like torn ligament? Options here include MRI, ultrasound and arthrograms.

 

First off, not every injury is imaged. Why? Sometimes a careful exam by your doctor can answer the question – imaging in these cases is not done, unless symptoms do not improve in the expected manner. There are carefully developed rules helping your doctors determine who will benefit the most from imaging in the case of many of the common injuries, for instance ankle sprains.

 

After your doctor’s initial evaluation, you may be sent for imaging. In many cases this will start with conventional films (x-rays) to exclude fractures or other bony changes. Beyond that, a patient will be directed based on the clinical concern.

 

Imaging of patients who have multiple sites of injury from a fall or motor vehicle accident for instance may be done with CT. This allows quick evaluation of bones as well as some types of soft tissue injuries. Multiple structures can be evaluated at the same time with CT, such as looking for fractures in the lower back, while also assessing the abdomen for signs of damage to internal organs.

 

Soft tissue damage, such as torn cartilage or ligaments, will often not be apparent on a conventional film. Visualizing soft tissues can be done with ultrasound, MRI or an arthrogram (where contrast material or dye is introduced into the joint space). We may follow the arthrogram with imaging with MRI or CT.

 

So… we will start our journey of the joints with your shoulders! (See you Thursday!)

 

(Photo credit: Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes by james.swenson13 via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!