Posts tagged ‘noninvasive’

September 26, 2014

Save a Man’s Heart!

Obesity-waist circumference by Victovoi via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public DomainHaving seen enough episodes of Grey’s Anatomy (or ER or any of a dozen other TV shows about medical practitioners) you may well know the amount of work a doctor can put in to save a man’s heart. OK, that is television and not real life.  As doctors, we love to save lives! We prefer to do it preventatively and proactively.

 

So… what does it take to save a man’s heart? It is easy; exercise, limited alcohol consumption, no cigarettes and a healthy BMI are the keys. The more items a man follows from this list, the better protection for the heart.

 

Here’s what blew our collective mind:

 

80% = the number of heart attacks in men that are preventable with a healthy lifestyle. Eighty!

36% = the risk reduction of heart attack by not smoking

12% = the risk reduction of heart attack by keep a waist measurement below 37”

3% = the risk reduction of heart attack by exercising on a regular basis

 

These numbers come from a recent study in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology. And also from the land of amazingly great news.

 

Get yourself or your man on the road to your best possible health by engaging in a healthier lifestyle and make those numbers work in your favor!

 

 

(Image credit: Obesity-waist circumference by Victovoi via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public Domain)

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health at www.mammographykc.com and general radiology at www.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

June 20, 2014

We Love… The National Stroke Association!

Does the face look uneven by Charles Hope via Flickr Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)Just to be clear, we love the National Stroke Association, which is the opposite of loving strokes. After our series on vascular imaging as well reporting on recent studies on stroke prevention, it’s important to talk about the warning signs, additional prevention and what can be done if someone is suspected of having a stroke.

 

In health, action is everything.- for strokes, time means brain.The longer those neurons or brain cells go without blood flow, the greater their chance of death and loss of function. The sooner we  react to a situation, the better the chances of recovery. This is why it’s important to know the signs of a stroke and what to do if one is happening.

 

First, if you believe a stroke is occurring, call 911 immediately. What are signs of a stroke? They are sudden and can include any of the following: numbness, weakness, confusion, trouble seeing, walking or speaking, and/or severe headache. Nerve changes like numbness and weakness may occur on only one side of the body. Act immediately – time equals brain!

 

Risks for cerebrovascular disease and stroke include modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors. The National Stroke Association has an excellent breakdown of the many, many potential risk factors here. If you have any of these risk factors, from family history of strokes, to diabetes or high blood pressure (to name just a few), extra vigilance and modification of those factors you can control is key.

 

Strokes are disorienting experiences and can present with a wide spectrum of findings, based on which part of the brain is being affected. For an insightful first-person account, Jill Bolte Taylor’s TEDtalk about her experience (“My Stroke of Insight”) is a fascinating video.

 

Because of all their hard work toward the best possible health for all, we love The National Stroke Association. And if you like them too, you can do so here!

(Image Attribution: Does the face look uneven? by Charles Hope via Flickr Copyright Creative CommonsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0))

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

June 18, 2014

The Study Is Out: Animal Proteins and Strokes

 

Copper river sockeye smoked salmon mit salat und crumpet 07.04.2012 20-30-53 by Dirk Ingo Franke via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedNow that we’ve discussed carotid Doppler, CT angiography and MR angiography, here’s a reminder that we are advocates for an ounce of prevention over a pound of cure. Preventing vascular disease is much better than detecting it!

 

According to a recent analysis of seven health studies, one of the best ways to fight stroke is by a healthy diet (pause to act surprised here). One key to that healthy diet is lean animal protein (okay, you’re allowed to be surprised now).

 

The study showed that as lean protein intake increases, stroke risk decreases. This study included over 250,000 patients but was focused on those living in countries where unsaturated, lean proteins like fish are popular. Those who ate 20 additional grams of protein a day had a 26% lower risk of stroke. What is behind the reduced risk is less well-understood. Likely, there are multiple factors involved. For instance, a protein-rich diet can also naturally include extra nutrients like potassium, magnesium and dietary fiber, all of which may be stroke deterrents.

 

We should not take this study to mean increase your protein intake without considering the type or quality of the protein -lean animal protein seems to be the key here. While the occasional steak or hamburger is acceptable, increasing your daily dietary intake of these type proteins will not yield the same results seen in this study.

 

The long and the short of it is this: a careful diet is good for you; proteins, including lean animal proteins, seem to help with reducing stroke risk. For further reading, there are articles summarizing the findings here and here.


For your best vascular health, don’t smoke, keep cholesterol and glucose levels healthy, and consider a diet focused on healthy lean proteins.

June 13, 2014

Vascular Series Part 3 – MRA

MRAAs part of our continuing series on vascular health and imaging, we’d like to talk about another way of seeing into your body and imaging blood vessels: MR angiography, or magnetic resonance angiography.

 

MR angiography is different than CT angiography in that it uses MRI or magnetic resonance imaging with no radiation. This is a benefit of MR angiography.  MR angiography may or may not require use of an IV injection. When needed, MR angiography uses a different type of contrast material for injection – gadolinium-based instead of iodine-based. This is particularly helpful for people with iodine-contrast allergies or poor kidney function.

 

MR angiography can be used to image the blood vessels and blood flow. The procedure can produce some truly beautiful pictures of blood vessels (the physics behind creating those images is fascinating – and complex!). The vessel walls and adjacent tissues can be seen, as opposed to traditional angiography which shows only the vessel lumen or the inside of the vessel. CTA is the best tool for showing the walls of the vessels themselves.

 

So, what do we use MRA for?

 

We can use it to evaluate almost any artery or vein in the body. For example, MR angiography of the head (usually done without contrast) is helpful when looking for aneurysms (saclike outpouchings arising from blood vessels which can be deadly or disabling if they bleed) or areas of artery narrowing. To evaluate the abdominal aorta, we can look for aneurysms (abnormal dilatation) or dissection (when there is a tear in the vessel creating two channels). We may be asked to evaluate the renal arteries for narrowings- renal artery stenosis is one of the treatable causes of high blood pressure.  MR angiography can also be used to examine the leg arteries when needing to evaluate for causes of pain when walking.

As we have discussed, there are lots of ways of imaging the blood vessels. Often, ultrasound with Doppler is used first to see if there is a need for further investigation. CT angiography or MR angiography can further define the vessels and identify problems that may need to be addressed either surgically or with interventional radiology procedures (angioplasty, stenting). Traditional catheter angiography is often reserved for those cases that will benefit from vascular intervention.

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

June 11, 2014

Vascular Series Part 2 – What Is CT Angiography (CTA)?

CTACT angiography, or computed tomography angiography, (now you see why we like to call it CT angiography- such a mouthful!) is a way of imaging the blood vessels and surrounding tissues.

 

Why would we do that? CT angiography is a noninvasive way to exquisitely evaluate blood vessels within the body. With a simple venous injection of contrast we can quickly and elaborately evaluate the artery, the wall of the artery and the surrounding tissues.  Let’s look at an example. Say we need to evaluate patients with suspected narrowing in the neck arteries – CT angiography may follow an abnormal carotid Doppler to confirm how narrow the vessel is and to see if surgery will be necessary. It will show calcifications and noncalcified plaques and show how they affect the lumen (inside of the vessel) of the artery. This test is helpful in planning any necessary surgeries.

 

CT angiography can also be used to look at the arteries in the head for patients with strokes from bleeds. Aneurysms  (focal outpouchings) and their relation to the vessel are well seen and this procedure can help plan interventions needed to address them.

 

So now we know why we need to perform CT angiography, it begs the question, why is this modality of imaging the best choice for a situation? In the past, catheter angiography was the traditional way of imaging blood vessels of all types. However, it involves  putting a catheter through the skin into vessels, usually with an approach through the groin or in the arm. This creates beautiful images of the insides of the vessels, but is associated with some risks related to the catheter and the arterial puncture.

 

CT allows us to get exquisite images of the vessels with an injection into a vein in a less risky fashion while also allowing us to see the blood vessel wall – not just the lumen as is seen in traditional angiography. CT angiography can be used to evaluate blood vessels from the head to the toes and most parts in between.

In some cases, CT angiography has replaced or nearly replaced the need for catheter angiography (CT angiography chest to evaluate for pulmonary emboli or blood clots in the vessels in the lungs is one example). Other times, CT angiography will identify those patients that will benefit from catheter angiography – often this is used when interventions like angioplasty (ballooning narrowed areas in the arteries) or stenting (putting in metal or mesh stents to open up narrowings) are needed.

 

All told, CT angiography may be a lot of syllables but it can save a lot of lives.

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

February 14, 2014

Heart Health: CT Coronary Angio

Here is an image from a CT coronary angiogram showing the aorta (the main blood vessel coming out of the heart and bringing blood to the body) with the coronary arteries coming off the aorta and going around/to the heart – the heart has been removed from the image so we can see the vessel, much like is seen on a heart catheterization. These arteries show no significant narrowings.

Here is an image from a CT coronary angiogram showing the aorta (the main blood vessel coming out of the heart and bringing blood to the body) with the coronary arteries coming off the aorta and going around/to the heart – the heart has been removed from the image so we can see the vessel, much like is seen on a heart catheterization. These arteries show no significant narrowings.

Now that we’ve covered CT coronary calcium scores, we’d like to talk more about noninvasive heart imaging.

There are several ways of studying artery narrowing or blockages of the coronary arteries of the heart. Two common exams are the CT angiogram of coronary arteries and the coronary angiogram, also known as a heart catheterization or “heart cath.”

For a CT angiogram, radiologists use CT technology and intravenous contrast to noninvasively image the arteries. A heart catheterization, usually performed by a cardiologist, uses a small catheter threaded through the blood vessels to the heart to inject contrast into the arteries.  The exam may require light sedation, and the use of catheters in the heart has risks including but not limited to blood vessel damage, arrhythmias, bleeding and stroke.

It has been shown that 40% of heart catheterization procedures in women and a smaller percentage in men are normal.  In those cases, nothing is wrong with the arteries and nothing requires treatment like angioplasty or stenting.  Having a less invasive, safer exam to evaluate people at risk for heart disease or symptoms of heart disease is a bonus – particularly for those patients with lower risk and potentially normal coronary arteries.

CT angiography of the coronary arteries uses CT, EKG, intravenous contrast and sophisticated 3D post processing techniques to create 3D images of the heart and heart arteries for analysis. Both soft plaques and calcified arterial plaques can be imaged and analyzed for severity. The determination for noninvasive or invasive treatments can be made from this study. The  procedure takes approximately 30 – 60 minutes, requires little preparation and the results are shared with the ordering physician for further review.

For patients at high risk for coronary artery disease, or those likely needing intervention such as angioplasty (treating narrowed arteries with a balloon) or stenting, a traditional heart catheterization is recommended. This allows diagnosis to be followed by immediate treatment.

CT coronary angiography can be considered for the following patients among others:

  • Patients with a strong family history of heart disease.
  • Patients with multiple risk factors for heart disease such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, diabetes.
  • Patients with atypical chest pain.

Talk to your medical provider if you have questions regarding this examination or questions regarding your personal risk for heart disease.