Posts tagged ‘symptoms’

July 2, 2014

We Love… Free to Breathe!

Free to Breathe logoFor all our talk about lung cancer screening, what we’d love most is to not need screening at all – which is to say, what if… lung cancer were not the threat it is today? This is why we love Free to Breathe!

 

Free to Breathe’s mission is to “ensure surviving lung cancer is the expectation, not the exception.” For all the strides being made in the war on cancer, lung cancer lags behind in both survivorship and early detection.

 

Contrary to popular belief lung cancer doesn’t just occur in smokers (though smoking does radically increase risk and if you need to quit, here are a few things to know). Lung cancer can also run in families of nonsmokers, can be seen in those affected by secondhand smoke, may result from some environmental/ industrial exposures and may arise in people without specific risks.

 

According to scientific studies, “People who have never smoked account for 20,000 – 30,000 lung cancer diagnoses every year.”

 

Not only is it a debilitating and potentially deadly disease, lung cancer is typically detected late in the game. Signs and symptoms often show up late, but may include breathing-related issues like coughing up blood or trouble breathing but also back, shoulder or chest pain. See your doctor promptly if you have concerns.

 

Free to Breathe’s vision is to cut lung cancer deaths in half by 2022. We can’t wait for this to be the reality! We encourage you to like them here too.

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

May 14, 2014

What’s Up with Your Neck? (and just below…)

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Have pain in your neck or upper back? You are not alone! While less common than low back pain, pain in the neck is a common complaint leading to doctor’s office visits. Pain in the upper back is somewhat less common, but we will include it in our discussion for completeness.

 

In a recent post we talked about imaging of the lumbar spine, the lower portion of the spine which sits behind your belly.  Much of the imaging for the rest of the spine is similar to what is done for the lumbar region.

 

The cervical spine (coming from the Latin word for neck) is sometimes referred to as the C spine. It consists of the first seven vertebrae (from the skull) and the cartilage discs between them, in addition to adjacent ligaments and muscles. A lot of motion (up,down, around!) occurs in this part of the spine during the day, so this is a common spot for symptoms of overuse or muscle strain to occur.

 

Patients with cervical spine problems may have pain in the neck with or without symptoms in the upper arms/shoulders – this can be pain or can be nerve type symptoms like numbness or tingling. How far the symptoms go down your arm can help indicate the level of involvement in the cervical spine.

 

The T Spine is the thoracic spine consisting of the 12 vertebral bodies, discs, adjacent muscles and ligaments at chest level. There is less movement of the spine at this level, so symptoms here are less common. Symptoms of thoracic spine problems may include pain in the upper back, shoulders, arms, or to the sides of the chest. Nerve symptoms like numbness, tingling or weakness may also be present.

 

As in the lumbar spine, there are a lot of age-related changes involving the discs and/or the adjacent bones; these may or may not be related to the patient’s symptoms. Imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine is generally performed after careful history and physical examination, and may be delayed to see if a trial of conservative treatment improves symptoms. Imaging immediately may be warranted if there are serious symptoms such as major trauma, weight loss, or nerve symptoms, particularly weakness of the arms or legs.

The spectrum of problems in the cervical and thoracic spine is similar to that in the lumbar spine and can include disc displacement, fractures, and muscle strain. Less common causes of neck and upper back symptoms include disease in the spinal cord itself, spinal cord tumors and things like multiple sclerosis. Note that the spinal cord ends at approximately the upper lumbar level; therefore, these problems do not directly affect the lumbar spine.

 

Imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine is similar to that for the lumbar spine. X-ray, CT and MRI can all be used to diagnose problems.Plain films or x-rays may be the best starting point as they can show alignment and fractures. X-rays can also show any narrowing in the spaces between the vertebra indicating disc disease. A CT shows bones and adjacent tissues and is the test of choice if we are concerned about fractures. CT can see the cord and nerve roots if we do it after a myelogram (more commonly done with C spine than with the T spine). Last, an MRI can show the spinal cord, nerve roots and discs and how they relate.

 

Ultimately, imaging of the neck and upper spine may be helpful to determine the proper course of action to get you on the road to your best possible health!

(Image credit: Illu vertebral column via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Public Domain)


Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

March 6, 2014

Ultrasound for Appendix

Here is an example of appendicitis by ultrasound with a tubular darker gray structure at the site of symptoms corresponding with the inflamed appendix.

Here is an example of appendicitis by ultrasound with a tubular darker gray structure at the site of symptoms corresponding with the inflamed appendix.

Appendicitis is pretty common – about 680,000 people – both kids and adults – will be affected by appendicitis each year – that’s about 1 per minute in the US! The appendix is a blind-ending tube with no apparent function that extends off the first part of the colon or large intestine, in the right  lower part of the abdomen, near the hip bone.

Appendicitis may be diagnosed purely on physical signs and symptoms (right lower quadrant pain, focal tenderness, fever and elevated white blood cell count) in some patients. If the diagnosis is questioned and imaging is needed, there are several options. Ultrasound is a great first step because it is noninvasive, quick, easy and involves no radiation. Imaging right where the patient is symptomatic is also quite helpful and easy to do with ultrasound.

With ultrasound, images with gentle, slow, graded pushing on the area of symptoms in the right lower quadrant are obtained with a transducer or probe. Appendicitis shows up as a tubular structure that does not push out of the way or compress, often with changes in the adjacent fat from the inflammation. This will often cause the patient to say, “Ouch, that is where it hurts.” If the symptoms are NOT related to the appendix, ultrasound can also help identify other potential sources of pain in the area, such as ovarian cysts, problems with the kidney or problems with the small bowel among lots of other causes.

If the ultrasound is inconclusive but symptoms persist, a CT scan is also an option for evaluation of the right lower quadrant.

There are many causes for pain in the lower right abdomen – if you have symptoms, see your doctor. Your doctor – with or without the help of your friendly radiologist – can work to determine the cause of your pain and treatment needed to get you back to good health.

January 23, 2014

What are some side effects and symptoms of Hepatitis C? – with Dr. Angela Noto