Posts tagged ‘USPSTF’

June 17, 2015

Knock Out Lung Cancer with Low Dose CTs

Patient-Flyer---Lung-CT-UMKC

June 25, 2014

Lung Cancer Screening Gets Another Leg Up

Symbol kept vote Green by Zorglub via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedThe votes in support of low-dose screening CT chest for high risk smokers are growing. Recently the American Medical Association – the largest association of doctors from all specialties in the US – added their support to guidelines recommending this potentially life-saving exam.

 

Lung cancer is a killer. In the US, lung cancer causes more deaths than breast + prostate + colon cancer – more deaths than all of those cancers combined! Studies on low-dose CT screening (the National Lung Screening Trial) showed early detection saves lives! There was a 20% reduction in deaths in heavy smokers from lung cancer due to CT screening in this study. This is why low dose chest CT is so crucial. Finding lung cancer early, when it is potentially treatable is the goal of screening.

 

As accredited members of the American College of Radiology, we are thrilled that the ACR is fighting to support the recommendations of the United States Preventative Services Task Force for high-risk patients. (Read all about it here.) The Task Force recommended coverage beginning January 2015 for high risk patients, including those 55-80 years with significant smoking histories (defined as greater than a 30 pack-year history of smoking) or for those who were former heavy smokers who have quit in the last 15 years. The Task Force recommendations will apply to those patients with insurance.

 

The fight for coverage of Medicare patients is still on-going, and is the focus of the ACR and other groups. The Medicare Evidence Development and Coverage Advising Committee made a controversial stand against support of low-dose CT screening early this year. Medicare will make its final vote in the fall. We think including Medicare patients in coverage for this important, potentially life-saving exam is crucial.

Make your voice heard – add your vote in favor of low-dose screening CT chest for all who will benefit- including Medicare patients! Contact your local congresspersons (here) and let them know you agree.

(Image credit: Symbol kept vote Green by Zorglub via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Creative CommonsAttribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported)

 

Diagnostic Imaging Centers blogs on regularly about women’s health atwww.mammographykc.com and general radiology atwww.diagnosticimagingcenterskc.com. Visit our sites for more helpful information!

 

February 25, 2014

Task Force Guidelines on Aorta Screening in Smokers

Vincent Willem van Gogh (self portrait) Copyright Public Domain

Vincent Willem van Gogh (self portrait) Copyright Public Domain

This is a call to older male smokers. As a smoker you are at risk for many health issues. While heart and lung conditions are the more commonly known diseases for smokers, vascular diseases are another. Abdominal aortic aneurysm, or “AAA,” is yet another significant health issue that may be seen with higher frequency in smokers. An aneurysm is an abnormal ballooning or dilatation of a blood vessel. In this case, the aneurysm involves the aorta – the main artery carrying blood to the abdomen and lower body. As the aneurysm gets bigger, there is a risk of sudden death from rupture.

Recently the USPSTF, a task force that reviews guidelines and screening studies, came forward with a recommendation with the intention of saving lives. The Task Force has issued a recommendation for ultrasound screening of male smokers over the age of 65 for the presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Further research is needed to determine the usefulness of the screening test both in women who smoke and in older male non-smokers.

Making use of the simple non-invasive technology of ultrasound, one-time screenings for men in the high risk category will help improve survival from complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm. For more on the recommendation, we recommend this resource.

January 9, 2014

Smokers and CT Screenings

Smoking woman Kelsey by Kelsey via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Smoking woman Kelsey by Kelsey via Wikimedia Commons Copyright Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

As a follow up to our post in July of this year on the United States Preventive Services Task Force’s (USPSTF or task force for shorter!) draft recommendation with regards to lung cancer and CT screening, the final report has been recently published with full recommendations just in time to start the new year.

While the recommendations for who should undergo what type of screening have not changed since the initially-released draft, putting the full voice of the USPSTF behind it does have an effect. Under new healthcare legislation, Task Force-backed cancer screenings will be covered without co-pays in the relatively near future. This means that those who need screening tests will have greater access to them.

So, who needs to be screened for lung cancer? The task force has specified who fits in the high-risk category for lung cancer.

  • Those who smoke at least a pack a day for 30 years (or its equivalent, such as 2 packs a day for 15 years), are between the ages of 55-80 or have stopped smoking less than 15 years ago fall into the high-risk, should be screened category.

  • Exemptions are made for those who have been smoke-free for 15 years or more or those who aren’t currently well enough to go through cancer treatment.

If you fall in a high-risk category, screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT can save lives by finding lung cancer when it is smaller and more treatable, offering hope for a disease which until now had a pretty dismal outlook. The CT scan is done in a matter of a few minutes, and differs from a routine CT in that lower than usual dose is used so that the study can be repeated annually as needed.

And because early detection saves lives, this new CT screening test holds the possibility of moving the approximately 10 million high risk individuals* on their way to better health.

 

*Yes there are that many who fall into the “high risk” category. Please give up the habit!